BRILL
GALLERY

Studio 109, Eclipse Mill, 243 Union St., North Adams, MA 01247-0786, 800.294.2811 p/f, 845.661.3593 cell, email: info@brillgallery109.com

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ARTS OF WWII | JON ISHERWOOD | EVE SONNEMAN | LEONARD FREED

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LEONARD FREED BIOGRAPHY
1929 - 2006
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Leonard Freed was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1929 to a working class family of radical Jews from Eastern Europe. Freed took trips to Europe and North Africa in the early 50s and thought he wanted to become a painter. He studied in Alexei Brodovitchís design laboratory. Eventually Freed was intrigued by photography and how it could tell stories and explore life. Edward Steichen, then Director of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art learned of Freedís work and told him that he was one of the three best young photographers he had seen. Steichen advised Freed to remain an amateur and bought three of Freedís photos for the Museum.

In the early 60s Freed was living in the Netherlands when the photographs of the Civil Rights Movement in European newspapers compelled him to return to the United States. Freed was struck at what he saw as images of blacks in America that were often in the form of caricature. Freed set to create a body of work that refuted those caricatures and emphasized the individuality of his subjects. His subtle and thoughtful images comment on the unfairness of enforced segregation and provide context for some of the meaningful events that took place in America in the 1950s and 60s. Freed became famous with his involvement with the Civil Rights Movement as he offered photos of Harlem Streets, early images of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the publication of his book Black in White America in 1968. Several photos selected by the Smithsonian Institution from this series are now on exhibit at the Brill Gallery in the Eclipse Mill in North Adams.

In 1972 Leonard Freed joined the highly regarded group of Magnum photographers with whom he remained active until his death. He has worked on international assignments for the major international press including: Life, Look, Paris Match, Die Zeist, Der Spiegel, London Sunday Times Magazine, New York Times Magazine, GEO, LíExpress, Fortune, etc.

Photography became Freedís way of exploring complex issues such as societal violence and racial discrimination. In 1980 his book Police Work made statements about police brutality in words and pictures. Through photography Freed confronted the Ku Klux Klan, German Society, and his own Jewish roots through numerous exhibits, books and films. More than 10 books have been published on Freedís work and several are for sale at the Brill Gallery. Freedís photos are in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum, Stedelijk Museum, Smithsonian, Getty Museum, Jewish Museum, High Museum, etc. and various university, corporate and individual collections. Major exhibits of Freed's photographs will take place at the Muse'e de l 'Elyse'e in Lausanne, Switzerland and at the Leica Gallery in NYC in 2007. The Brill Gallery will continue the Freed Exhibit through March 07. Also, Freed's latest book on Venice is expected to be published in the coming months.

More that 40 photos are on display and for sale at the Brill Gallery at the Eclipse Mill Ė Studio 109 at 243 Union Street in North Adams. Hours are Fridays Ė Sundays, noon to 6pm and by appointment. For more information call 800.294.2811 or email: info@brillgallery109.com