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REFLECTIONS ON MELVILLE

HERMAN MELVILLE AND NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE

EXHIBITIONS BEGIN JUNE 2011

Eclipse Mill Gallery Exhibition, June 2011
Eclipse Mill Gallery Exhibition, June 2011

The following is on display now from
24 June 2011- 7 August 2011 at the:

Eclipse Mill Gallery
243 Union Street
North Adams, MA 01247-0786

413.664.4353

Thursday-Sunday 12PM - 6PM


Click Here For Directions


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This material may not be published, broadcast or redistributed. All Rights Reserved.



Melville's Whale
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 28” x 38”
$2,800. Framed. 1/10

This is a view of Mount Greylock from Arrowhead, what Melville would have seen on a fall morning. I enjoy the contrast of the country scene of field and woods’ edge with the monumental whale in the distance. This view inspired Moby-Dick.




WHALE RIBS ON MONUMENT MOUNTAIN
© Arthur Yanoff. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Acrylic & Collage on Canvas, 37 ½” x 54 ½”
$6,800. Unframed

Melville spies whale ribs in the rocks on Monument Mountain. Wild yellow summer rising towards infinite blue.




COIL OF TOW-LINE
© Arthur Yanoff. All Rights Reserved
2011, Acrylic and Collage on Canvas, 42 ¼” x 79 ½”
$12,000. Unframed

Snow. From Melville’s study, Mt. Greylock becomes an ocean. Small strands of Black rope are flying birds/fish. In the phosphorescent lime yellow, a whale tail is hidden from the aggressive tow-line. Throughout this painting is an unsettling movement. The restless recesses of Melville’s mind.




Monument Mountain Skin
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 23 ½” x 31 ½”
$1,500. Framed. 1/10

This is a cousin to Whale Skin, very nautical and old and fleshy. The lichen blotches add character and there is a rolling sensation from the curves of the rocks. There is a great feeling of layering, from the lichen growing on the rocks and the rocks piled one on top of the other – a sense of the age of the mountain and that which the mountain covers.




Unpardonable Sin
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 23 ½” x 31 ½”
$1, 500. Framed. 1/10

Melville and Hawthorne first met on Monument Mountain at a picnic, which was interrupted by a summer thunderstorm. When I first started to explore Monument Mountain, I was intent on finding any sort of cave that could have sheltered Melville and Hawthorne as they crouched together, waiting out the storm. The cave I found was too small to give shelter to two men, but it drew me in with its malevolent darkness, and brought to mind Hawthorne’s “Unpardonable Sin.”




RETURN TO THE HOUSE
© Arthur Yanoff. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Acrylic & Collage on Canvas, 54 ½” x 31 ½”
$ 8,000. Unframed

The harmony of Melville’s walk is turned upside down by the thought of colonization, intolerance, greed, slavery, exploitation. This painting – a grass door that portends troubles.




Towards the Sky
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 17 1/2" x 22 1/2"
$750. Framed. 1/10

There is a happy optimism about this photograph. The rock wears its age well, coexisting with a healthy growth of lichen that has temporarily dried in the warm sun. This is at the top of Monument Mountain, with a splendid view of the Berkshires just over the crest of this rock.




Hawthorne Stripped
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 17 ½” x 22 ½”
$750. Framed. 1/10

This photograph shows an austere, New England starkness. I am interested in the sectioning off of the picture in this image. What does each twig of the foreground tree cordon off? It is a study in organization and balance, much like Hawthorne’s own formality in writing.




Snowy Portrait
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 17 ½” x 22 ½”
$750. Framed. 1/10

I immediately thought of a ship’s rigging when I saw this hoarfrost-covered antenna on top of Mount Greylock. But the more I looked, the more I saw a relationshop between the tree and the metal, which reminded me of the strong-willed Hawthorne and the fragile, yet more yielding Melville.




Mountain Collaboration
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 17 1/2" x 22 1/2"
$750. Framed. 1/10

There seems to be some fantastic rock formation at every turn you make on Monument Mountain. Looking up between this tree and rock you can see two oblique masses reach out to each other, a meeting of the growing and the inert, the yielding and the firm.




ONE SIDE OF THE VALLEY
© Arthur Yanoff. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Acrylic & Collage on Canvas, 54 ¾” x 31 5/8”
$ 8,000. Unframed

An enormous rock head club. An illusion. Hawthorne’s great carbuncle is everywhere, even in “Typee.”




RAPTURE OF THE KING
© Arthur Yanoff. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Acrylic, Pastel & Collage on Canvas, 55 1/8” x 31 5/8”
$ 8,500. Unframed

A happy time. Music. High notes filling the expanse of yellow-green hills and land. The King of the Typees mermerized by the melodic sounds of Melville’s voice.




Scary Trail
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 22 1/2" x 17 1/2"
$750. Framed. 1/10

The rounded shape of the upper rock always reminds me of a scary hooded figure, face obscured and peering out from behind a tree: watching. Does it have something to tell me?




Squaw's Leap
© Kay Canavino. All Rights Reserved.
2011, Limited Edition Digital Archival Print, 22 1/2" x 17 1/2"
$750. Framed. 1/10

Looking uphill on Monument Mountain to the “maiden’s mound” elevates its importance. The rocks in the foreground suggest a prostrate figure. And the sunlight shining through the trees gives it a bit of reverence. The present-day mound is a poor representative for the original. But it does have historical importance, and it certainly makes you wonder what was there before, and why it isn’t there now. It is also a very peaceful little spot.